ThePa

JOURNAL OF THE EVENING STUDENTS’ ASSOCIATION

SIR GEORGE WILLIAMS UNIVERSITY

per

volume ONE - number fourteen Montreal - January thirteen/69

JIM FANNING

BASEBALL TALK IN

i

GENE MAUCH

On Wednesday January 15th at 12:30 p.m. Jim Fanning, General Manager and Gene Mauch, Manager of the Montreal Expos will speak at a Baseball Talk-Inin H-110.Russ Taylor of CFCF-TV will host the event.

The Talk-In is sponsored by the SOCIETY FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF MANAGEMENT. Billy Kowal, Vice-President stated in a press release to THE PAPER that this will be Mr. Mauch’s first day in Montreal.

Gene Mauch, 43, has 81/2 years of major league managing experience all with the Philadelphia Phillies of the National League from 1960-67. He guided the Phils up from 8th place finishes in 1960 and 1961 to a tie for second in 1964.

Mauch, born in Salina Kansas, had a lengthy career as a player-perfor- ming for clubs in both the National and American Leagues - before ma- naging. A right-handed throwingand battling infield, he appeared in 304 major league games over a span of 16 years (including 45 games with

BLACK STUDIES

PROGRAM

A new program on Black Studies is finally underway in Sir George. Sponsored by Professor C. Davis of the Department of Education, Leroy Bucher, and Phil Griffin, un- der the auspices of the Black Stu- dents Association, the plan calls for a series of lectures and readings by educators from the United Sta- tes.

The lecturers, all Black, have been chosen for their knowledge and ac- tivity in the various areas to be dis- cussed in coming weeks. Their con- tributions to the Black identity is best explained by their current po- sitions in various educational ins- titutions as well as impressive lists of publications.

The program, will be held in the Alumni Auditorium, Room H-110 of the Hall Building, and is free and open to the public. Further information may be obtained from Professor Davis at 879-4536.

the old Montreal Royals of the International League).

Jim Fanning, born in Chicago in 1927 and holding degrees from the University of Illinois, played for 8 years in the Chicago Cubs. He played and managed in South Ame- rican Leagues from 1957 to 1959. He managed and scouted for the Milwaukee Braves from 1961 to 1967. Fanning was appointed direc- tor of the Central Scouting Bureau in January, 1968. On August 14th, 1968 Fanning was appointed Gene- ral Manager of the Montreal Expos.

SUMMER

COURSE LOAD EVALUATION

January 13th: The Univer- sity Councils’ sub-commit- tee studying summer course loads is conducting a survey (see page 2) on Evening Stu- dent attitudes towards change in summer course loads. In a recent interview with Dean Butovsky of the Arts Faculty, he said that the reason for the survey was to get enough opinions from Evening Students so that the course load could be re-evaluated in light of changing requirements of the Evening Students.

The committe, meeting later this month, will decide at this time what the regu- lation changes, if any, will be effected for the 1969 sum- mer sessions,

ENCOUNTER WEEK

In conjunction with the publishing of the report of George R. Mar- shall to the co-curricular committee, on ‘‘The Educational effects of an Extended Living Experience between a face-to-face group of students and faculty’’, THE PAPER files this par- tial report on the results of the pi- lot study.

During the encounter week, 15 to 18 students were in attendance full- time (at a fee of $10 each) along with four faculty members. Since the con- cept of the living experience is to de-emphasize roles, very little struc- ture as we have it in our daily lives and in the university was provided. It was left up to the individuals (fa- culty and students) to recognize problems and make their own choice as to whether to fill the breach or not. This included numdane activi- ties such as cooking, washing dishes, general cleaning, feeding the animals, and gathering firewood. However, all these things were performed to a most reasonable degree without direction from ‘‘higher’’ authority. These func- tions were performed out of a feeling for general good, not duty.

In our modern society, role playing from what is termed arole standpoint is all too prevalent. However, as Dr. Marshall pointed out, when the need for role playing is taken out of per- sonal interactions, the level of perso- nal development and communica- tions between people has an oppor- tunity to increase.

This was emphasized both ona group level and individual level. So- me individuals wrote poetry, prose or chose to paint. One student cho- se to paint even though he hadn’t done so for some years. One student at the farm found an exam in En- glish on Hamlet. One evening, a few of the students and faculty, each taking one of the acting roles, read Hamlet and turned an academic as- signment into a shared living expe- rience.

DRURY TO TALK

AT S.G.W.U.

“Bud” Drury, Chairman of the Federal Treasury Board has been invited to speak at Sir George Wednesday January 15th. The S.G.W.U. Liberal Club will sponsor the event that will see Mr. Drury talk on government spending and priorities under the Trudeau regime.

The meeting, to be held in Room H-420, will start at |:15 p.m. and will open to all interested parties and questions from the floor will be entertained.

UCSL PROGRESSES ON SENATE BRIEF

On Saturday, January 11th, at ameeting ofthe University Council on Student Life the legality of the Evening Stu- dents’ Association was established as an outcome of deli- berations, and due to the firm stand of its Executive, the Evening Students’ Association has won its struggle to be recognized on a par with the day Students’ Association.

The Student Affairs Senate proposal was modified to re- flect the general opinion that the Evening Students’ Asso- ciation and Students’ Association are to remain in existen- ce as the basic student governments.

There was a proposal made to establish a Council on Student Life which is to gi- ve the Evening Students’ Association and Students’ Association equal represen- tation and rights. This it- self with matters of relevan- ce to both day and evening

There was a proposal made to establish a Council on Student Life which is to gi- ve the Evening Students’ Association and Students’ Association equal represen- tation and rights. This new body will report directly to the proposed University Se- nate and it will concern it- self with matters of relevan- ce to both day and evening students. Including Health, Placement Services, Hous- ing, Athletics, Orientation, co -curricular Activities, Foreign Students, Space, Extra-Curricular Activities, Student Rights and Respon- sibilities, ternal fairs and Student Services. In a- nother category the Coun- cil on Student Life will al- so be involved with finan- ces, registration and other non-academic aspects.

The original senate propo- sal by Mark Medicoff,

Kallas, Don Rosenbaum, and other day students, (which would have comple- tely eliminated the Evening Students’ Association and would have emasculated night students be leaving them a grossly unrepresen- ted minority in the Senate vis-a-vis day students who have a 4 - 1 radio to their advantage) was altered in order to create a form of co-operative federalism. This federal proposal pre- vents a central, unatary and dictatorial system from being imposed.

Key advocates of this co- pea federalism were

SA president, Mr. W. O’Mahony and ESA Arts Re- presentative, Mr. R. Miles who worked Friday andinto the early hours of Saturday morning in order to prevent morning in order to present constructive alternatives which would enable the E- vening Students’ Associa- tion to continue its existen- ce and role in the universi- ty community.

The new suggested struc- ture will enable the Senate to exist in conjunction with the various faculty commit- tees, the new Council on Student Life, and the Eve- ning Students’ Association and Students’ Association - each fulfilling its consti- tuent responsibilities and

having full participatory in- cont’d on page-15

CHANGE THE U.N.

Lester B, Pearson, former Ca- nadian Prime Minister, atartled the world with a proposal to ra- dically reform the United Nations along regional lines in a speech on December 15th, 1968 on the British Broadcasting Corporation.

Mr. Pearson drew on his know- ledge as president of the U.N, General Assembly in 1952 and as long-time chief Canadian Am- bassador to the United Nations,

To be strong the U. N. must be made less national and more united, he said in a lecture com- memorating John C, Leith, first director general of the B.B.C,

*s] think we should regionalize to a greater extent than at the present some of our U.N. activ- ities, especially those of the 126 member general assembly’? he said,

cont’d on page-13

AFunny Thing Happened On The Way Io The Forum

2 THE PAPER January 14, 1969

BULLETIN BOARD

OPEN MEETING EVENING STUDENTS’ ASSOCIATION EXECUTIVE COUNCIL MEETING JANUARY 13TH MONDAY 8:30 PM ROOM #-331

COMMITTEE on Philosophy and Goals

Deadline is January 15th. for briefs from interested parties, For further details call Prof, A. Tarasofsky at 879-5824 or Prof, C, Martin at 879-5925

Radio SIR GEORGE

Evening Students interested in participating in working in Radio Sir George may get more details and information any Monday or Tuesday between 5 and 8 pm in Room H-64l, Hall Building.

St, 0: ¢: Student Lab on Communication

Friday to Sunday January 17th through 19th at La Caleche Hotel Ste Agathe Registration with Day Receptionist on 3rd floor, or E.S.A. offices H-331-1. Information Laurie Abrams H-337 or 879-4578

EVENING

SCIENCE FACULTY

MATH CLUB PHYSICS CLUB CHEMISTRY CLUB BIOLOGY CLUB

The above clubs are in the process of being for- med. Anyone interested in joining and participa- ting in these clubs is re- quested to fill out the coupon on this pageand drop it off at the E.S.A. office in Room H-331 or phone Ray Cornell at 879-2832.

DUEL IN ASSOCIATION WITH

T.V. SIR GEORGE DIRECTED BY JOSEPH STRICKS

ULLYSES

ALUMNI AUDITORIUM H-110 HALL BUILDING STUDENTS $1.00 PUBLIC $2.00 JAN. 17TH - FRIDAY JAN. 18TH - SATURDAY 7 and 9:30 PM

ASSOCIATION ENGINEERING WEEK FEBRUARY 10TH TO 15TH ENGINEERING STUDENTS WANTED TO SUBMIT PROJECTS INFORMATION: ROOM H-349 HALL BUILDING 1:30 - 3:30 PM MONDAY TO FRIDAY

STUDENTS

ASSOCIATION ACTIVITIES

Iam interested in finding out more about

PD ea as ctw ode ncs cdncevacbigaswaccuaeycteess

AVAILABLE WHEN: ................scesesceee

DROP THIS FORM OFF AT THE ESA OFFICES IN ROOM H-331 OR THE PAPER IN ROOM H-338.

ENGINEERING STUDENTS’

wh

ON SOCIOLOGY DEPARTMENT

GEORGIAN PLAYERS

A FUNNY THING HAPPENED ON THE WAY TO THE FORUM

A rollicking, hillarious broadway musical for young and old alike. Not to be missed.

Jan. 14th to 19th 8:30 pm Admission - Public $2.50 - Students $1.75

Tickets available at Mezzanine Level Hall Building 1455 de Maisonneuve Blvd. or call 879-4594

Asa ae

SOCIOLOGY STUDENTS

OPEN MEETING

THURSDAY JANUARY I6TH 5:30 p.m. ROOM H-605

PURPOSE

TO DISCUSS EVENING STUDENT REPRESENTATION

EVENING STUDENTS NOTE

HISTORY SOCIETY

GENERAL MEETING

FRIDAY JANUARY 17TH 2 PM ROOM H-609 INFORMATION: WAYNE FABER 352-0248

CLASSIFIED

RATES: Classified

Advertising rates for registered students are 75 for each insertion. Rates for non-students are $1.50 Content is limited to twenty-five words. Cash must accompany all ads. Thead- vertising deadline for each Monday edition is Thursday noon. Ads may submitted to the Editor's office, Room H-338, Hall Building, 1455 de Maisonneuve Bivd. West.

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SUMMER COURSE LOAD EVALUATION

The University Council has established a Committee to look into the matter of course load for summer session Evening Students, The present regulations limit this course load to two full courses but considers, as maximum course load, all single 400 level and certain 200 level courses starred in the Summer Session Calendar as maximum course load,

In attempting to re-evaluate the present situation and make recommendations to University Council, your answers to the following questions would be helpful.

The purpose of this brief questionnaire is to gain information to assist the Committee in properly ascer- taining the requirements of Evening Students,

SUMMER COURSE LOAD EVALUATION QUESTIONNAIRE

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FACULTY: ' -

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3.SHOULD THE COURSE LOAD LEVEL BE CHANGED TO INCLUDE A MAXIMUM TWO COURSE AT ANY, LEVEL INCLUDING 400 AND 200 STARRED COUR- SES? eeeeceeoeeeeeeceeareae eeerteaeaeecetceeeeee eeeeceete eeseeeeeeceeoere#

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MAXIMUM COURSE LOAD INCLUDE TWO (2) 400 OR 200 STARRED COURSES:,

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BLACK STUDENTS’ ASSOCIATION OF SIR GEORGE WILLIAMS UNIVERSITY

Speakers for Informal Black Studies Program, 1969 Friday, January 17th

Don L. Lee - Poet: staff member of the Museum of African- Ameri-

can History and teacher of Afro- American Literature at Columbia College, Chicago, 111. He is on the Editorial Staff of Black Expres- sion: A Journal of Literature and Art; and is a book reviewer for Negro Digest. Mr. Lee is currently Writer-in-Residence at Cornell Uni- versity, Ithaca, New York. Author of three volumes of poetry, Think Black, Black Pride and Don’t Cry, Scream - due for publication in January 1969. Poems and articles have appeared in Negro Digest, Journal of Black Poetry, Mu- hammed Speaks, Evergreen Review, Liberator, Freedomways, The New York Times and other publications.

Bob Hamilton - Poet: teacher of Black Literature at Queens College, N.Y. Editor of Black Caucus and Soulbook. Mr. Hamilton’s poetry and articles have appeared in Negro Digest, The National Guardian, Black Arts, and other publications. He is also a painter and sculptor.

Keorapetse Kgositsile - Poet, Essayist: Mr. Kgositsile, who was born in Johannesburg, South Africa and educated thereatthe Ohlange Ins- titute, has been living in the United States since 1962. His work has been published in Negro Digest, Liberator, Journal of Black Poetry, Presence Africaine, Transition, The New African, and other journals and several anthologies, including Black Fire. He has read and lec- tured on ‘“‘Contemporary Black Poetry”’ at many colleges and univer- sities, including Columbia University, Atlanta U., Queens College, Howard U., and U. of Buffalo. Two books of his poetry, Spirit Un- chained and For Melba are scheduled for pubtication this Spring. These poets will read from their own works. ~

Friday, January 24th

James Turner - Mr. Turner graduated sumna cum laude from Cen- tral Michigan University and received his M.A. from Northwestern University where he also completed the Graduate Africa Studies Program. He is currently a Ph.D. candidate in political sociology. Mr. Turner has been the recipient ofaJohn Hay Whitney Fellowship, and African Studies Program Fellowship, an N.D.E.A. Foreign Lan- guage Fellowship, and an N.I.M.H. Research Fellowship. Among his published articles have been ‘‘Afro-American Perspective on Africa” and ““Black Man in a White Defined Society”’.

Lecture topic: “Black Nationalism - the function of an ideology of Ethnic Identity’.

Friday, January 31st

Dr. Chichi Onwauchi - Dr. Onwauchi is director of the African- Ca- ribbean Study Center at Fisk University, Nashville, Tennessee where he is also professor of Anthropology. Hismembershipsinclude the A- merican Anthropological Association, the Society for Applied Anthro- pology, the American Sociological Association, and the African Studies Association. Among his published articles have been “Identity and Black Power’ and “African Traditional Culture and Western Educa- tion’’.

Lecture topic: ‘‘Anthropology from a Black Point of View’’.

Friday, February 7th

Dr. Charles V. Hamilton - Formerly Chairman of the Political Scien- ce Department at Lincoln University in Pennsylvania, Dr. Hamilton now holds that position at Roosevelt University in Chicago. He was co-author with Stokeley Carmichael of Black Power: The Politics of Liberation in America. Two other books by Dr. Hamilton will be re- leased shortly. They are The Politics of Civil Rights and Negro Po- litics and Political Modernization. His articles have appeared in the New York Times Magazine, Negro Digest, Partisan Review, Freedom- ways, etc.

Lecture topic: “Race, Politics, and Social Change: Beyond ‘68’

Wednesday, February 12th

Julius Lester - Mr. Lester, a graduate of Fisk University in Nashvil-

le, Tennessee is a former Field Secretary for SNCC. He is presently:

a free-lance writer and has had many articles published in The Na- tional Guardian, The Village Voice, Broadside, Liberator, and other publications. He recently had a book published entitled, Look Out Whitey! Black Power’s gon’ get your Mama. Mr. Lester is also a pho- tographer, with photos printed in The Movement, and a folksinger, with two albums of original and traditional folk songs to his credit. Lecture topic: “Beep! Beep! Bang! Bang! Umgawa! Black Power!”

Friday, February 21st

Michael Thelwell - Originally from Jamaica, Mr. Thelwellis presently on the faculty of The University of Massachusetts at Amherst, where he teaches Black Literature and Creative Writing. He has had articles and short stories published in Negro Digest, Partisan Review, Free- domways, Presence Africaine, and The Massachusetts Review, where he is also on the Editorial Board. He has a critical essay in William Styron’s Nat Turner: Ten Black Writers Respond. Winners of several prizes for short stories, Mr. Thelweill is a consultant to the National Endowment for the Humanities. He was active for several years with SNCC and the Mississippi Freedom Democrat Party.

Lecture topic: ‘‘Black Sterotypes in White Literature’’.

Friday, February 28th

Robert S. Browne - Mr. Browne, who received his education at the University of Illinois, the University of Chicago, and the London School of Economics, is currently Assistant Professor of Economics at Farleigh-Dickenson University in New Jersey. He had many articles pu- blished in Freedomways, The New York Times Magazine, Ramparts, ‘The New Republic, and other publications. He has just completed a book entitled Race Relations in International Affairs. Mr. Browne al- so spent a number of years in Cambodia and Viet Nam as a public official and has lectured and written extensively on the U.S. presen- ce there and the condition of Black military personnel.

Lecture topic: ““The Economics of Black Separatism”’

GEORGIAN SNOOPIES STILL FLYING HIGH

The Georgian Snoopies, new to Sir George this year, have now grown to a membership over 90 active participants. Back reports have covered their growth from a small Evening Student Asso- ciation group to a bonafide day- evening group that appears to be well organized and on the move.

In an interview with Harold Fues, President of the Snoopies, The Paper asked him about fu- ture plans. This year they plan to continue events until March, but until then a program will in- clude participation by several companies in the ground instruc- tion program. The program, hea- vily weighted in favour of all important navigational proficien- cy, will see Dr. Melvil Jones of the Institute of Aviation Mede- cine talking about advancements in that field as well as Air Cana- da, Canadair, United Aircraft, Ca- nadian Marconi, and Canadian Aviation Electronics sending in specialists to discuss commercial aviation, radar, turbine engines and air frames.

Harold said that the Snoopies hope to have 3 or 4 private pi- lots graduated along with at least one commercial license passed before the cessation of this year’s events.

WHERE IS IT?

The EDUCATION WEEK- LY from the Department of Education of Quebec dated APRIL 11, 1968, in an article on university budgets sta- ted;

“Tt also seemed essential to make a substantial in- crease in budget-balancing grants to Quebec universi- ties. About $88 million will be allocated for this purpo- se in 1968/69, up from $67 million during the fiscal year now ending’.

In reality, the expressed in- tention of the government to increase financial assis- tance to the universities did not fully materialize. Mr. Cardinal and his group of “‘experts’’ decided that what would do the English schools the most good was a decrease in assistance. Perhaps the English tax- payer should review his as- sistance,-to the Department of Finance in light of this. If your fees go up next year you know who to blame don’t you. Remember this at election time.

E.S.A. FORUM MEETS

The newly formed Evening Stu- dents Association Forum has wasted no time in organizing it- self into a working club. Original- ly reported as the Debating Club, the Forum is a more easy going idea of how individuals express

ideas on an informal basis.

As Fred Schmuck put it ‘“‘The normal idea of a debating club has been one of a speaker ram- bling on with his podium and glass of water to assist him with a particular importance being pla- ced on the ability of the individual to be able to speak to an audien- ce’’. The Forum is designed to help individuals express themsel- ves in an informal atmosphere.

What they have in mind is a

January 14, 1969 THE PAPER 3

group sitting around a table ona casual basis discussing topics and issues using only the guidelines of a set topic agreed to by the participants with an appointed moderator for each session.

The first open meeting is sche- duled for Friday, January 17th at 7:00 p.m. in Room H- 435. The meeting will be open to both e- vening and day students and requests will be welcomed.

BIOLOGY CLUB SPONSORING FILM ON FEMALE STERILITY

“Female Sterility” is the name of a special film being presented by the Biology Club of Sir Geor- ge. The three biological aspects of female sterility will be fully explained in the film lasting some 30 minutes and Dr. R. Shatz of the Jewish General Hospital will be on hand to answer questions from the audience as well as pro- vide a laymans interpretation of the more clinical approaches in the film.

Originally shown to day students last December, the enthusiasm and attendance by day students prompted the club to make the film available during evening hours. Mrs. T. McRae, club se- cretary, expressed her interest in seeing the Biology Club ex- tend its activities to the evening

student population and she poin- ted out that this type of presen- tation is a particularly mature endeavour for evening students to see and find out about.

The film will be shown in the Hall Building, Room H-635 at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, January 15th.

She also recommended that the male population take special in- terest in the film as it would pro- vide insight into many of the problems women face. She cau- tioned however that the emotio- nal aspects of female sterility are not touched upon in the film.

Should conditions permit it, a second film on the surgical pro- cedures to correct female sterili- ty will be presented.

E.S.A. CONSTITUTION COMMITTEE ROLLING ALONG

On Friday evening, January 3rd, the second meeting of the E.S.A. Constitutional Committee was held. The meeting was attended by Fay Lamont, Eunice Smith, Ian Buchanan, Esmond Dunne and John Walsh.

The committee incorporated into their ‘Proposed Constitution’’ a preamble, then went on to the second review of: the responsibilities of the Executive Council of the E.S.A., those of the individual re- presentatives and those of “standing’’ committees, active at the pre- sent time.

Additional items discussed included a review on or of: electoral pro- cedures, timing and tenure of office.

It is expected that the revised constitution (‘‘proposed’’) will be pre- sented to the Electoral college at the meeting scheduled for the end of January or beginning of February 1969.

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4 THE PAPER January 14, 1969

Editorial

THE DANGER OF NATIONALISM TO CANADA

Canadians are today developing a greater sense of national pride than ever before. Consciousness of our recent Centennial celebra- tions have led to a growing awareness of our nationhood and our potential for greatness. Despite the seemingly positive aspects of this new nationalism, it has also raised the spectre of a negative chauvi- nism that would reject our traditional policy of brotherhood and frien- dly mutual co-operation with America. Tocontinue our economic growth it is essential that we reject the unhealthy policy of anti-Americanism.

Another danger lies in our cultivated ignorance of Europe and of the European Culture which is the basis of our Western Civilization. It

would be wise to avoid encouraging the typeof petty nationalism that

divided European brother against Canadian brother in the futility and

fratricide of WORLD Wars | and Il. It is a vital necessity for the conti-

nued survival of the Western World that we seek to stress and foster the values and common heritage that can politically reunite us and provide a source for a renewed spiritual resurgence of our Culture.

Europe is not merely the fossil of our forgotten past -- it still remains as the potential fountainhead for a truly progressive future. Canada, far from abandoning N.A.T.O. should try to expand it according to its original long-range purpose advocated by Lester Pearson. That purpo- se was to make N.A.T.O. the foundation for a social-political-cultural union between Europe and America.

Nationalism despite its colour and widespread sentiment must be ca- refully regarded as an outdated 19th Century emotion that has made our Western World heir to its present decadence and decline, and as such must be sublimated in favour of the more uplifting and futuris- tic concept of a firm Canadian- European relationship.

PARKINSON’S LAW

It has become more and more apparentthatthe expansion of bureau- cracy on the 3rd floor has led to the confirmation of the practical va- lidity of Parkinson's Law. The essence of Parkinson's Law implies that with the expansion of areas of responsibility ‘endless committees and sub-committees, etc.), the general situation becomes more and more complex and less and less ts accomplished. Stated as a formula it is as follows: The efficiency of an organization is inversely proportional to the expansion of responsibility.

A meander down through the chasm of the third floor will reveal to any casual onlooker that bureaucracy has indeed gone mad. On the receptionists’ glass cage isalargecomplicatedanddaily growing chart of the various executives and appointed office-holders whodwell in an ever-burgeonning number of cubbyholes, replete with modern desks, typewriters and full executive office regalia, whether or not they are of any utility or practical service to the student body. Besides the vast number of desks, and the multitude of appointed positions, there is the additional phenomena of ‘the committee’. Committees are as super- fluous and ubiquitous as the sands on the seashore. And yet, what have all the infinite number of briefs on this and that accomplished? What has the extended verbiage, tenuous logic, andcontrived eloquen- ce of the new powers on the SLC and ASA accomplished in terms of meaningful academic or social assistance to the student. Where has all the money gone? Would it not be a good idea to make member- ship and dues to the students’ association voluntary- then we would see how much students appreciate our massive burgeoning bureau- cracy. Or are the new establishment powers too carefull and wary to allow the students to choose?

We are inclined to think that the less government, the better govern- ment, and we feel that Parkinson's Law is most applicable to the pre- sent 3rd floor situation. We ask the average student to go down into the nightmare valleys of a bureaucracy fulfilling its wildest and most futile potentialities and observe. The situation speaks for itself and is apparent to any unprejudiced and unjaundiced eye. At least one no- table exception to this general milieu of purposelessness is the Com- merce Student Association and executive who havequietly and effecti- vely put into action concrete and useful programs with a minimum of expostulating and a maximum of tangible work.

Perhaps another observation on student government is that power corrupts and total bureaucratic power corrupts totally.

THE IMPOSSIBLE TASK

ss Meany

SS

~* S ee

THE GALE WIND IS GETTING STRONGER

LETTERS

to the editor ESTABLISHMENT

Dear Sir: First of all | want to wish youand your staff

well in your task of publishing The Paper. | have just returnedfrom two years in England and Europe and | would like to point out that the situation which you, the students in Mont real, find yourselves inis being duplicatedin the major seats of learning throughout the world. May | take up a few moments of your time in order fo pass on toyouthe observa tions of a traveller.

The greatest thing that has impressed me, and this involves the unconscious reactions that you students are involved in, is that for the past 500,000,000 years or so, nature with the help of God Almighty has been moulding a universal environment for this thing called "man" and inless than 50 years, this thing that we call the ‘proletariate” or “establishment'’ has managed to provide us with an electronic warning system, which, at best, limits our existence to 20 minutes,

| do not think thal this is very intelligent; and, as a matter of fact, if thisis the expres sion of all the efforts onthe part of educators, politicians and theologians down throughthe generations, then | think that it is the expres- sion of utmost stupidity on their part toconti- nue to impose, on students and peoples who are dependant on the establishmentfor their directives, a setofconditions which are being questioned by students even in the lower grades.

It should be evident that if laws of natural progression had not been tampered with, then the situation in which we find oursel- ves would certainly not have come about. However, a system came into being about 2,000 years ago whereby the proletariate of that time foisted upon the masses a set of laws of progression. This is manifesting itself in many ways. Race riots, religious, turmoil, economic and political upheavals, and finally and probably most important, the student reaction to a system which they know is not working.

You may well ask how this all happened. The answer to this is rather complicated for it involves relativity, but let's try it this way: The establishment discovered through time that the mental energy of an individual could be accelerated and oriented by various ar tificial means; first, came light, and later through the guise of foisting upon the peo- ples, the necessity of following in the steps of the sacrificial Christ, the establishment found out that mental control to their satis- faction could be achieved by various me- thods: electricity, magnetism, high energy metal implants, high frequency light (va- rious colours), drugs, cerebral operations, etc. This is the power of the establishment and this is what you, the students, are ac- tually unconsciously involved in - the whole idea, that something is wrong, or out of pha- se.

Sock it to'em! Yours truly, J. Neri

CANADIEN

Dear Sir:

In our present day and age, we have a trend towards nationalism. Here in Canada this trend is prevalent but yet, is not what |, as a Canadian, would like to see.

Here in Quebec we find our freres Fran- cais attempting to establish their own natio nal identity. | applaud their quest, but | can not help but feel that they seem to lack a sense of direction towards attaining their goal, They don't want a Canadian identity, they want a French identity.

This search seems to reflect on the rest of les Canadiens as we fail to have any such aim. Most Canadians still refer to thensel- ves as English Canadians, French Cana dians in contrast to some other nationali ties, e.g. Americans, not English or Jewish or German Americans. | could name more, but space does not permit such.

| would like to see every Canadian identi fy himself with one word; Canadian. Not English Canadian. | say: ‘| ama Canadian”. Je dit: “Je suis un Canadien”.

Yours truly, R.J. Cornell, Un Canadien.

POETRY

Sirs:

| do hope to see students of the evening di- vision respond to the idea of one page of poetry per issue.

Sincerely yours,

Luc Lechno

Sirs:

| would like to briefly tell you how stupen dous your newspaper is in printing every thing that leads to change for the better and that enhances our university. | would also like to thank our administrators for their good logic and zeal in patching up the “black blob’ in H-110 and in transferring the rear projector to a front projector. Now we can boast that we have a real cinema house. | knew that our good administrators have only the best interests for the students and the university at heart.

May | also take up another line in wishing our good administrators the best of every- thing for this New Year.

Yours truly

Joseph Di Paolo

Day Arts Ill

FLU SHOTS ARE AVAILABLE AT THE

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W, Montreal 107, Québec, Canada.

The Paper

THE PAPER is a weekly journal published under the auspices of the Evening Students’ Association of Sir George Williams University. Offices located in Room H-338, Henry Hall Building, 1455 de Maisonneuve Blvd.

‘Telephone: 879-2836

Editor: Wayne S. Gray Associate Editor: James MacLellan Advertising Manager:Brian Levy Tony Malbogat Steve Brent Circulation Manager: Rick Stanford The Paper reserves the right to publish any and al] submissions and

to abridge lengthly articles or correct grammar where necessary. All submissions should be typewritten when possible.

Publication: Weekly every Monday Deadline: 8 p.m. Tuesday prior to publication

H-003 N-022

RADIO SIR GEORGE

VOICE OF THE CONCRETE CAMPUS 8:45 AM TO 6 PM

TUNDEX

ON THE AIR JANUARY 13TH TO 1 POPULAR TUNES 1) 1 HEARD IT THROUGH THE GRAPEVINE MARVIN GAYE 2) FOR ONCE IN MY WIFE STEVIE WONDER 3) CLOUD: NINE TEMPTATIONS 4) Love Child Supremes 5) Cinnamon Derek 6) Going Up The Country Canned Heat

7) Crimson And Clover

8) Son Of A Preacher Man Dusty Springfield

9) Both Sides Now Judy Collins

10) If I Can Dream Elvis Presley

11) Everyday People Sly and the Family Stone 12) Are You Happy Jerry Butler

13) I’ve Gotta Be Me Sammy Davis Jr.

14) Malinda Bobby Taylor and the Vancouvers 15) People Tymes _

16) I Can’t Turn You Loose Chambers Brothers

17) Put Your Head On My Shoulder Letterman

18) California Dreamin’ Bobby Womack

19) Crosstown Traffic.

20) California Soul

21) Bluebirds Over The Mountain 22) Shame Shame

23) I Put A Spell On YOU

Jimmi Hendrix Experience Fifth Dimension

Beach Boys

Magic Lanterns

%) A Minute Of Your Time Tom Jones

25) You Got Soul Johnny Nash

26) Chitty Chitty Bang Bang Paul Mauriat

27) Vance Roger Miller

28) Goodnight My Love Paul Anka

29) L. A. Breakdown Jack Jones

30) In A Long White Room Nancy Wilson

DISCoveries BUT YOU KNOW I LOVE YOU - FIRST EDITION FOX ON THE RUN MANFRED MANN

GOOD LIFE LISTING

1) BOTH SIDES NOW JUDY COLLINS

2) TILL VOGUES

3) 1VE GOTTA BE ME SAMMY DAVIS JR.

4) CYCLES FRANK SINATRA

5) Put Your Head On My Shoulder Lettermen

6) Vance Roger Miller

7) A Minute Of Your Time Tom Jones

8) They Don’t Make Love Like They Used To Eddy Arnold

9) Not Enough Indians Dean Martin

10) Chitty Chitty Bang Bang Paul Mauriat

11) L. A. Breakdown ( And Let Me In) Jack J ones

12) In A Long White Room Nancy Wilson

13) Goodnight My Love Paul Anka

14) Yesterday’s Rain Spanky and Our Gang

15) If I Can Dream Elvis Presley

SOUL SAUCE

1) 1 HEARD IT THROUGH THE GRAPEVINE MARVIN GAYE

2) CLOUD NINE TEMPTATIONS 3) FOR ONCE IN MY LIFE STEVIE WONDER 4) Love Child Supremes

5) Are You Happy

6) Malinda

7) Goodbye My Love 8) Always Together 9) California Dreamin’ 10) Everyday People

Jerry Butler James Brown Delis

Bobby Womack Sly and the Family Stone

SOPHISTICATED COUNTRY

1) WHEN THE GRASS GROWS OVER ME

GEORGE JONES 2) YOURS LOVE WAYLON JENNINGS 3) THEY DON’T MAKE LOVE LIKE THEY USED TO EDDY ARNOLD 4) Flattery Will Get You Everywhere Lynn Anderson 5) The Town That Broke My Heart Bobby Bare 6) Ballad Of Two Brothers Autry Inman 7) Vance Roger Miller 8) In The Good Old Days Dolly Parton 9) Ever Changin’ Mind Don Gibson 10) Name Of The Game Was Love Hank Snow

PREVIEW EXTRAS

Nobody----- 3 Dog Night-----RCA Victor Heart-Teaser-----Flavor----- Columbia

Nightmare----- Arthur Brown-----Polydor

America----- The Nice-----Immediate

I’m The Urban Spaceman-----The